TENNESSEE

Fraternal Order of Police

The Voice of Tennessee's Law Enforcement.

 

MEMBER

BENEFITS

LEGAL AID

The Fraternal Order of Police has a robust legal aid plan to ensure your rights as a law enforcement officer are protected on the job. We offer civil, criminal, and administrative coverage to members enrolled in the plan who are involved in an on-duty incident that requires representation. find out more info at www.foplegal.com.

FREE COLLEGE

FOP members, and their families, can get an associates degree at no cost.  The FOP also offers other continuing education options at a reduced rate through our national partners.

FRATERNAL EVENTS

The FOP is more than a legal aid plan! We are family! Local, state and national lodges offer several fraternal events every year where our members can come together and network with their law enforcement family!

DEATH BENEFIT

Nobody wants to think about those final moments in life, but the reality is, none of us will live forever. In the event of a member's death, their designated beneficiary will receive a $1,000 benefit. If that death is in the line of duty, the benefit is increased to $5,000.

LEGISLATIVE

It is absolutely crucial that your voice is represented during the legislative session at the state legislature and in Washington. The legislative director for the Tennessee FOP works with the state and local lodges to ensure the legislative priorities of the FOP are advanced, your voice is well represented and your rights are protected.

TRAINING

The FOP recognizes how important it is for you to stay up to date on new information related to our noble profession. That's why our state and local lodges offer members training at either a reduced FOP rate or no cost to our members.

 

OUR HISTORY

In 1915, the life of a policeman was bleak. In many communities they were forced to work 12 hour days, 365 days a year. Police officers didn’t like it, but there was little they could do to change their working conditions. There were no organizations to make their voices heard; no other means to make their grievances known.

This soon changed, thanks to the courage and wisdom of two Pittsburgh patrol officers. Martin Toole and Delbert Nagle knew they must first organize police officers, like other labor interests, if they were to be successful in making life better for themselves and their fellow police officers. They and 21 others “who were willing to take a chance” met on May 14, 1915, and held the first meeting of the Fraternal Order of Police. They formed Fort Pitt Lodge #1. They decided on this name due to the anti-union sentiment of the time. However, there was no mistaking their intentions. As they told their city mayor, Joe Armstrong, the FOP would be the means “to bring our aggrievances before the Mayor or Council and have many things adjusted that we are unable to present in any other way…we could get many things through our legislature that our Council will not, or cannot give us.”

And so it began, a tradition of police officers representing police officers. The Fraternal Order of Police was given life by two dedicated police officers determined to better their profession and those who choose to protect and serve our communities, our states, and our country. It was not long afterward that Mayor Armstrong was congratulating the Fraternal Order of Police for their “strong influence in the legislatures in various states,…their considerate and charitable efforts” on behalf of the officers in need and for the FOP’s “efforts at increasing the public confidence toward the police to the benefit of the peace, as well as the public.”

From that small beginning the Fraternal Order of Police began growing steadily. In 1917, the idea of a National Organization of Police Officers came about. Today, the tradition that was first envisioned over 90 years ago lives on with more than 2,100 local lodges and more than 325,000 members in the United States. The Fraternal Order of Police has become the largest professional police organization in the country. The FOP continues to grow because we have been true to the tradition and continued to build on it. The Fraternal Order of Police are proud professionals working on behalf of law enforcement officers from all ranks and levels of government.

The Tennessee State Lodge of Fraternal Order of Police was organized in 1955, in Oak Ridge TN. The Tennessee State Lodge has over 70 Local Lodges that represent nearly 10,000 members.

FOP EMBLEM, the emblem adopted by the Fraternal Order of Police should remind all members of their duties as a citizen, a police officer, and a member of this order. First, the five-cornered star, the same as in our National Emblem, and tends to remind us of the allegiance we owe to our flag. The star is also the symbol of authority with which all police officers are more or less invested. This authority conferred upon you by the people is an honor, for in this act they recognize in you an ability and power, and equal to the task set before you; they also place in you their trust and confidence.

Midway between the points and center of the star is a blue field. The points are of gold, which indicates the position under which we are now serving; the background is white, being a virgin or unstained color, represents purity; one is to allow nothing of a corrupt nature to be injected into our Order; therefore blue, gold, and white are our colors. In the three uppermost blue fields are the letters F.O.P., which is the monogram of the Order. In the blue field, lower left corner, is an open eye, the eye of vigilance, the ever watchful eye, which notes the danger, and offers protection to the public, asleep or awake. In the blue field, lower right corner, is a hand-clasp, which denotes friendship. The hand of friendship should always be extended to a worthy Brother or Sister with good advice and a few kind words.

The circle surrounding the star midway indicates our never ending efforts to promote the welfare and advancement of this Order, and within its bounds we are all one great and powerful unit. In the half circle over the centerpiece is our motto, Jus Fides Libertatum, which translated means Law is a safeguard of Freedom. In the center of the star is the seal of Fort Pitt , to remind us of where the first efforts were put forth to establish this Order.

 

STATE BOARD MEMBERS

SCOTTIE DELASHMIT
PRESIDENT

Tel: (901) 500-6645

swdfop@gmail.com

SAM KNOLTON
SECRETARY

Tel: (931) 206-1633

samknoltonlaw@yahoo.com

JOE BURNS
CHAIRMAN OF TRUSTEES

Tel: (615) 818-3179

joeburns45@gmail.com

SHANE TREW
VICE PRESIDENT

Tel: (865) 789-9361

trews11@gmail.com

LARRY McCOY
TREASURER

Tel: (731) 460-2555

rpdl103@bellsouth.net

JOHNNY CRUMBY
NATIONAL TRUSTEE

Tel: (615) 405-6481

crumby13@comcast.net

DAN GRAGG
2nd VICE PRESIDENT

Tel: (931) 260-8253

dan.gragg40@gmail.com

DAVID COWAN
SERGEANT AT ARMS

Tel: (423) 421-5144

dcowan170@gmail.com

ANDY GREEN
CHAPLAIN

Tel: (615) 708-6211

ag911catering@gmail.com

 

CONTACT

TENNESSEE

STATE FOP

OUR ADDRESS

P.O. Box 2787, Clarksville, TN 37042

Email: tnstatefop@gmail.com
Tel:  (931) 802-5545

Fax: (931) 933-7738

 

Click Here to Find Us

For any general inquiries, please fill in the following contact form:

 

"Fraternal Order of Police," "FOP" and the Fraternal Order of Police Star Emblem are Federally Registered Trademarks of the Grand Lodge Fraternal Order of Police.
Copyright © 2004-2010, Tennessee State Lodge Fraternal Order of Police. All rights reserved.

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